Sports Blog

3 Reasons For and Against a Blue Jays Rebuild

Source: TSN

Source: TSN

Should they, or shouldn't they?

That question seems to be on the minds of every Blue Jays fan when pondering the possibility of a rebuild. The franchise that stole the hearts of over 35 million fans across this beautiful nation by making it to two consecutive ALCS series has taken a massive nosedive to the cellar of the league's standings. Yes, I know it's early. Yes, I know nobody should be looking at the standings before July 1st. However, when a team that has been picked by experts to make the playoffs starts this poorly, it becomes hard not to look at the standings. 

As of May 3, 2017, the Blue Jays hold a record of 9-18, which places them 29th out of 30th in the league only behind Kansas City (which is a whole other story in itself). Ironic that the two teams who ferociously dueled it out in the 2015 ALCS and created the infamous Caleb Humphreys scandal are now dueling it out for last in the entire league just two years later. At least we won't have to hear any more terrible interviews from Erin Andrews and awful lies from the Amish sensation...if you forget what I'm talking about, click here.

The Blue Jays are not strangers to slow April starts. Last season, the Blue Jays finished April with an 11-14 record. Should we classify the past month as just another "slow start" for the Jays, or should Toronto fans be slamming the panic button? Below are three reasons why the Jays should rebuild as well as three reasons why they shouldn't.

Reasons to blow this team into smithereens:

1) The start is the main catalyst for the whole "rebuild" conversation to even take place. The benchmark record to make the playoffs based on last year's standings was the Blue Jays record of 89-73, which placed the team in a tie for the Wild Card spot with Baltimore. Let's assume that it will take 90 wins to get to the playoffs in the American League this year. In order to accomplish this, the Jays must go 81-54 the rest of the way. Even that mark might not be enough to get this team in the playoffs. Does the core of this team have what it takes to reach this benchmark?
2) This team isn't getting any younger. With an average age of 30.7 on the MLB roster, the Blue Jays are the oldest team in baseball (thanks Grilli...). A rebuild is inevitable, so why not get a head start on it and get some value for quality players sooner rather than later. Some valuable Blue Jays that will become free agents after the 2017 season include Marco Estrada and Francisco Liriano. They have been one of the few shinning spots in an abysmal start to the year, and there's nothing more coveted by a playoff team than reliable pitching down the stretch.
3) Our farm system is actually better than most Blue Jays fans realize. Ranked 19th by SB Nation (who admits they could have ranked the Jays system as high as 12th) and 16th by Bleacher Report, the Jays farm system is not top tier but it is serviceable. If the Blue Jays were to trade players such as Estrada, Liriano, Happ, and even Bautista and *gasp* Donaldson, they could grab some mid to top tier prospects and suddenly have a top 5 farm system once again. Players such as Rowdy Tellez, Sean-Reid Foley, Lourdes Gurriel, Anthony Alford, Richard Urena and more are waiting in the wings for their opportunity to shine on the big stage. They would be more than capable of coming on to a big league roster that would go in the direction of "we don't need to win now, but keep the game exciting" stage. Oh, and don't forget about Vladimir Gurerro Jr. He's pretty good too.

Stay the course you overreacting idiot (actual words from a colleague of mine):
1) I don't need to remind you that the Jays started the year 1-9 do I? I didn't think so. BUT since that disgusting start, the Blue Jays have played better of late, going 8-9 to bring their record to 9-18. Hovering around .500 at this time of the year is respectable, especially when you couldn't even reach .120. The recent play suggests that the Jays players might actually be adjusting to playing proper baseball and potentially turn this season around for the better.
2) Feeding off the first point, the Jays have been able to accomplish this recent record of 8-9 without arguably their best players. Donaldson, Tulo, Happ and Sanchez are all on the 10 day DL with some form of injury, and yet this team has found it within them to play at a level that keeps them treading water. Yeah, we see you Goins and Pillar.
3) Remember that 11-14 record I told you about from April 2016? The Blue Jays were the only team in the league last season to make the playoffs with a record of more than one game under .500. They seem to find an extra gear in the months of May and June, so what's to stop this team from doing the exact same thing and shocking the baseball world yet again?

There's a lot of information to digest, which makes this decision not an easy one either way. Fans seem to be divided on the topic, and one way or another someone won't be happy with the outcome. What would I do if I were Ross Atkins and Mark Shapiro? I give this team until the end of May before I start making a decision. If the team performs at a rate lower than a .500 clip (a record worse than 22-31 by end of month) I would blow it up. Percentages and odds are not in your favour, and I would want to recoup value for assets as supposed to letting them go for free.

It's going to be an interesting summer, regardless of the Blue Jays results.

Toronto, PLEASE Don't Turn Into New York

Source: Cogeco

Source: Cogeco

Dear Toronto sports fans,

As a city, we are collectively in a situation that has never been experienced before. We are finally beginning to breed success with all three major sports teams. The beloved Maple Leafs finally appear to have a promising future ahead with all star rookies and arguably the league's brightest coaching staff and front office. The Blue Jays have made it to two consecutive ALCS series, lead by an American League MVP and a fantastic starting rotation. The Raptors have made it to the postseason for the fourth year in a row, and Ujiri has single handily turned around a franchise that was the laughing stock of the NBA (excluding the Kings, they will always be trash). Hell, even TFC has managed to capture the hearts of all sports fans across this wonderful city.

Rolling Stone recently wrote an article explaining why Toronto looks to become the next sports mecca in North America, which can be viewed here. Reading this article made me think of other sports cities and meccas across North America. Cities such as Boston and Los Angeles come to mind, but arguably the highest profile of them all is New York. When New York teams are successful, sports media can't get enough coverage of them, players flock to the city practically begging to play for their teams and fans will lay roses at the feet of anything and anyone associated with sport success. We are currently in an era where New York sports have taken a turn for the worse. Let's take the Knicks for example. Media still cover them, but every piece that comes from them seems to revolve around negativity. Players and their agents claim to be avoiding the sinking ship and its captain James Dolan. Which leads me to the fans...they will not hesitate to pick up the roses they laid on the ground and use the thorns to stab everyone they deem to be "a disgrace to the city", which on a failing New York sports team is literally everyone.

The city of New York is used to seeing championships. The fans expect nothing less than championship calibre teams year after year. As quickly as they praise athletes is as quickly as they shun them. I see the same behaviour in Toronto whenever a team is on a losing streak or doesn't start the year off quite like it hoped (we are all looking at you Blue Jays). Toronto sports fans can't be like this, and I am here to explain why.

1) We are Canadians. It is literally unpatriotic to be rude or impolite to anybody, especially our sports teams. I have never heard anyone say they love people from New York more than people from Toronto, so let's not go down to their level.
2) They have seen a lot of championships in the past few decades. Toronto fans haven't stood in a parade route for almost 25 years. I get it, I'm hungry for a championship too, but let's take success where we can.
3) People will begin to view Toronto and Canada in a different light if they see us running players and executives out of town. While an extreme example, Vancouver has left its reputation tarnished forever with these riots from losing the 2011 Stanley Cup Final.
4) Speaking of negative perceptions, Toronto needs to act like it's been there before. Throwing beer cans on the field during the playoffs and being labelled as "the most despised fan base in baseball" doesn't help distinguish us as the polite Canadians that we are... 
5) There's a difference between critical analysis and plain stupidity. It's okay to have an opinion and have healthy debate, but saying outlandish things such as suggesting trading former AL MVP Donaldson because he is hurt doesn't give us true fans a good profile.

People in general seem to like and respect Toronto. For some sports, Toronto represents not only a city, but a nation. We as Toronto sports fans need to understand this, accept it and embrace it. Let's enjoy the ride, and let's enjoy the processes and changes that come along with it. When the mighty Toronto teams fall, and they inevitably will, we need to hold our heads high and know that this generation of Toronto sports has firmly placed our city as a premier North American sports city.