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Toronto Raptors Game 5 Summary - Why We Watch Sports

Source: Frank Gunn / The Canadian Press

Source: Frank Gunn / The Canadian Press

When people ask me why I watch sports, it’s all because of the games like the one on Monday night. Sports provide the biggest roller coaster rides in the world, and it’s rare to have a team you cheer for be successful throughout the duration of you cheering for them. What normally happens is you have very few periods where they’re at the top of the world, and then you’re brought back down to Earth for a very, very, very long time. Along with these periods, there are countless heartbreaks and moments that make you question why you continue to subject yourself to unnecessary stressful and heart-wrenching situations. Last night gave us a prime example of what sports do to people. They make you scream in happiness and hug random strangers, and then the next second your mind is boggled and there’s nothing that can make you feel better. Sports bring out these moments and once they’re over they sit with you for days after until the next game.

Source: Awful Announcing

Source: Awful Announcing

Game Five tested the totality of our emotions. With all the drama and story lines it was hard to focus on our game-plan and during the game I found myself always concerned where Kevin Durant was as opposed to focusing on the Raptors. Prior to the game, Downtown Toronto was electric and I had never seen lines that long for restaurants and bars over four hours before the game. And afterwards it was the longest commute I’d had in ages and the areas surrounding Scotiabank Arena were the quietest it’s been. From the start of the game you could feel nervousness, excitement, euphoria, stress, anxiousness and possibly every emotion you could ever experience, and by the end everyone felt the same way: defeated. 

Source: CityNews Toronto

Source: CityNews Toronto

There is someone else who felt defeated and his name is Kevin Durant. Coming into the series, I wanted to play against KD because I wanted us to beat the best. That being said, I didn’t think he looked ready to play at all and thought we wouldn’t see him (looking back, I wish the Warriors staff realized this too and didn’t put him in). So when I watched the beginning of the game I was surprised at how good his shots looked and I was happy that we were playing against the Warriors’ full roster. But when he pulled up and stopped playing I was immediately saddened. You never want to see anyone get injured, especially when it involves one’s Achilles. To think about all the hard work he put in over the years just to be hindered by this random event breaks your heart. And I know it affected countless fans around the world as well, but I also know there were also people inside Scotiabank Arena and outside the game that did not act as appropriately to this injury.

Source: Gregory Shamus / Getty Images

Source: Gregory Shamus / Getty Images

This has been a huge debate ever since it happened, as people are saying how Canadians acted inappropriately and should be ashamed of their actions, and I know the people who cheered have realized their faults. It was evident they did by their reaction afterwards when they applauded for KD’s effort and chanted his name. My opinion is that it was an honest human reaction to the situation. I think that in any arena in the NBA, some fans would immediately cheer for the injury, not because they’re happy the player was injured, but because their team has an advantage. It’s a horrible response as it takes away from the understanding that it is a person these people are paying thousands of dollars to be entertained by, and it’s the reality that people forget how hard and how much these players have given up just to be playing in that situation. It’s easy to forget that each of these players are human when you watch them for entertainment and I hope that moving forward this is a learning experience for everyone who watched.

It’s not my experience with the people of this city...You understand this is about an individual, a human being and not, ‘oh, shoot he’s out, he’s hurt, we won the championship.’
— Steph Curry

Now, onto the game itself. We lost because we did not play well, it’s as simple as that. The Warriors set a record for 3-pointers made on the road in an NBA Finals Game with 20, and we only made 8. Our defence was not what it was in the prior games and our shooting did not match our efforts earlier on as well. There’s been much discussion as to the last play, but I think it was a great play with Lowry getting off a great shot. It’s just that Draymond played even better defence and somehow managed to get a piece of the ball on its way up. It was painful to watch as we all knew Game Five was the perfect situation to win and how amazing would it have been to have Lowry hit the game-winner after his years of hard work for our team. The emotion we all felt when Kawhi went on his 10-point run was unparalleled as we knew the trophy was minutes away, however we just couldn’t close it out. Like I said earlier, we watch sports to experience the highs that occur, and they wouldn’t feel as amazing if we didn’t experience the lows that come with them.

Source: Chris Young / The Canadian Press

Source: Chris Young / The Canadian Press

There are two possible games left and although we won’t be matched up against arguably the greatest ever team with KD out of the lineup, we have the opportunity to win the only trophy that matters, and we are unbelievably close. Best wishes to KD for his recovery and hopefully we’ll be able to beat him in the Finals to come.

Toronto, PLEASE Don't Turn Into New York

Source: Cogeco

Source: Cogeco

Dear Toronto sports fans,

As a city, we are collectively in a situation that has never been experienced before. We are finally beginning to breed success with all three major sports teams. The beloved Maple Leafs finally appear to have a promising future ahead with all star rookies and arguably the league's brightest coaching staff and front office. The Blue Jays have made it to two consecutive ALCS series, lead by an American League MVP and a fantastic starting rotation. The Raptors have made it to the postseason for the fourth year in a row, and Ujiri has single handily turned around a franchise that was the laughing stock of the NBA (excluding the Kings, they will always be trash). Hell, even TFC has managed to capture the hearts of all sports fans across this wonderful city.

Rolling Stone recently wrote an article explaining why Toronto looks to become the next sports mecca in North America, which can be viewed here. Reading this article made me think of other sports cities and meccas across North America. Cities such as Boston and Los Angeles come to mind, but arguably the highest profile of them all is New York. When New York teams are successful, sports media can't get enough coverage of them, players flock to the city practically begging to play for their teams and fans will lay roses at the feet of anything and anyone associated with sport success. We are currently in an era where New York sports have taken a turn for the worse. Let's take the Knicks for example. Media still cover them, but every piece that comes from them seems to revolve around negativity. Players and their agents claim to be avoiding the sinking ship and its captain James Dolan. Which leads me to the fans...they will not hesitate to pick up the roses they laid on the ground and use the thorns to stab everyone they deem to be "a disgrace to the city", which on a failing New York sports team is literally everyone.

The city of New York is used to seeing championships. The fans expect nothing less than championship calibre teams year after year. As quickly as they praise athletes is as quickly as they shun them. I see the same behaviour in Toronto whenever a team is on a losing streak or doesn't start the year off quite like it hoped (we are all looking at you Blue Jays). Toronto sports fans can't be like this, and I am here to explain why.

1) We are Canadians. It is literally unpatriotic to be rude or impolite to anybody, especially our sports teams. I have never heard anyone say they love people from New York more than people from Toronto, so let's not go down to their level.
2) They have seen a lot of championships in the past few decades. Toronto fans haven't stood in a parade route for almost 25 years. I get it, I'm hungry for a championship too, but let's take success where we can.
3) People will begin to view Toronto and Canada in a different light if they see us running players and executives out of town. While an extreme example, Vancouver has left its reputation tarnished forever with these riots from losing the 2011 Stanley Cup Final.
4) Speaking of negative perceptions, Toronto needs to act like it's been there before. Throwing beer cans on the field during the playoffs and being labelled as "the most despised fan base in baseball" doesn't help distinguish us as the polite Canadians that we are... 
5) There's a difference between critical analysis and plain stupidity. It's okay to have an opinion and have healthy debate, but saying outlandish things such as suggesting trading former AL MVP Donaldson because he is hurt doesn't give us true fans a good profile.

People in general seem to like and respect Toronto. For some sports, Toronto represents not only a city, but a nation. We as Toronto sports fans need to understand this, accept it and embrace it. Let's enjoy the ride, and let's enjoy the processes and changes that come along with it. When the mighty Toronto teams fall, and they inevitably will, we need to hold our heads high and know that this generation of Toronto sports has firmly placed our city as a premier North American sports city.